Famous Supporters

Sarah Blasko

Singer
Sarah Blasko
Kids have a natural affinity for music, I really believe that, & so it’s very important they are encouraged & inspired. In my early teens, I loved singing & music, but I was told by my first music teacher that I didn’t have a musical bone in my body because I couldn’t read music. Naturally I was very discouraged by this for many years & so my hope is a music education for everyone.


Clare Bowditch

Singer and songwriter
Clare Bowditch
“I remember with great joy my music lessons at primary school with Sr Judith and her guitar. She knew exactly what she was doing, and she passed that feeling on to us, her students. Would I have grown up to be a musician if it were not for the seed planted in me at this early age? I’m not sure I would have. What I do know is this: creative-intelligence is going to be an exceptionally valuable, highly-regarded skill in the world of the future. So I say, start early. Invest it music teachers, and in the creative education of Australian children.”


Kev Carmody

Singer and songwriter
Kev Carmody
Through all of human history music has been a central part of our social existence. It was and is utilised to transmit: lores/laws, social customs, ideas, politics, theologies, passions, love, sadness, joy and hope among many other human concerns.

Music is an integral part of our human life’s journey. It is essential that all students be engaged and involved in this basic dimension of human expression.


Paul Kelly

At school we are rightly expected to learn basic science, english, maths and history. Music is just as important. Learning it develops the brain in new ways and helps a student to be better at learning overall. It teaches discipline, creativity and co-operation in an enjoyable way. It’s a language to travel with all over the world.

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Genevieve Lacey

Virtuoso recorder player
Genevieve Lacey
“Listening is an activity that connects us deeply to others. It can change how we perceive the world, and then, how we decide to live in it. “Musicians are consummate listeners. Listening with care, hearing complexity, and noticing subtlety need not be purely professional music practices, but tenets for living. Such listening has radical potential.

“To listen suggests an open, receptive stance, without necessarily knowing what will arrive. It suggests alertness, willingness. Listening is essentially an act of respect and generosity. It is a time for keeping our egos quiet, for hearing others’ needs and opinions.

“Many of the great leaders of historical and contemporary times, the visionaries, the peacemakers, the activists and healers, are essentially great listeners. A great leader has an ability to listen acutely to the concerns of their era, to imagine what might be possible, and to bring that to life.

“I would love every Australian child to have the chance to become a skilled listener. Listening is what music uniquely offers – a space to encounter, to experience, to extend our thinking and imagination. A musical education offers a child joy, hope, solace, fine motor and aural skills, an ability to interact socially in sophisticated ways, a tangible sense of the benefits of discipline and teamwork, a chance to become a gentle, charismatic leader, to learn how to compromise, to share, to create something bigger than themselves, to extend their empathetic ability, to harness their emotions and spin them into creative pursuits. All that, and the most essential human skill of all – the ability to listen deeply, and respond.”


Katie Noonan

Singer
Katie Noonan
I absolutely believe in the power of music. I think it is integral to life and believe it can help children so much with their development, learning and emotional growth. For this reason I believe a music education for every child is integral and in my eyes as important as any other subject.


Peter Sculthorpe

Composer

Peter Sculthorpe 3

Australia’s most famous composer endorses The Full Deal campaign.


Richard Tognetti

Artistic Director and Lead Violin, Australian Chamber Orchestra

Australian Chamber Orchestra

“Every Australian kid should have a right to a music education, just as they have a right to learn to read. Most kids will not become professional musicians but if the music teaching is good, they all will get something that can be important to them for their entire lives. Good teaching must bring them the great music of the past and present.

“It’s best if the music education starts early because that’s when the brain is most ready to pick up musical skills. It is essential that music education is provided through the schools because that is the only way that every child will have this opportunity.”

 

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